Fine-textured Appalachian sedge grows in clumps 12" tall in the dry shade of the eastern North American woodlands. Carex divulsa grows in clumps with intermingling narrow foliage. Performs well in shaded areas under trees or use as ground cover on slopes and meadows. Perfect for shady spots, Carex oshimensis 'Everillo' is a clump-forming evergreen Japanese Sedge with narrow, arching, lime-green leaves that gradually turn to golden-yellow as the season progresses. Perennial of the Month-- March 2015 (pronunciation at link) (care' ex ap-pal-A-chi-cah) Common name: Appalachian sedge Family: Cyperaceae, Sedge Height x width: 10-12in. Growth rate, habit: moderate, upright clumping Foliage: narrow blades 1.5mm or less wide, smooth/hairless or rough/sandpapery x 12-18in. Fairly drought tolerant once established but looks best with regular moisture. Tolerates heat and humidity; can naturalize in moist, boggy, clay, or sandy soils. Carex appalachica, commonly called Appalachian sedge, is a shade-loving perennial with soft, delicate, arching, semi-evergreen leaves. Staminate scales are green often tinged with reddish-purple with white margins. This superb sedge native from Quebec south to South Carolina is a must for shade gardeners. In early summer, it bears inconspicuous brown flower spikes on long stems. 144. Standing 12 inches tall and wide, Carex appalachica forms dense mounds of bright green foliage with an upright dropping habit. Threatened and Endangered Information: This plant is listed by the U.S. federal government or a state. Carex appalachica Appalachian Sedge. Ball – Appalachian sedge Subordinate Taxa. Carex appalachica J. Webber & P.W. Carex appalachica J. Webber & P.W. Carex pensylvanica, commonly called Pennsylvania sedge, is a shade-loving perennial sedge that is native to thickets and dry woodland areas in Eastern and Central North America from Quebec to Manitoba south to Mississippi and Georgia.In Missouri, it is found mostly north of the Missouri River in dry to mesic upland forests and shaded bluff ledges (Steyermark). Carex appalachica, above, is native to woodlands in the eastern United States. The Carex appalachica is growing on a hummock that is about 3-6″ higher than Carex pensylvanica, a testament to its need for drier conditions. Carex appalachica . It typically grows in a clump to 8" tall. Carex appalachica and Carex pensylvanica can, when soil conditions are just right, form a lush, weed-free native lawn effect in light woodland settings. Noteworthy Characteristics. Height: 12 in Spacing: 10 in Hardiness Zone: 3 - 8 The very narrow arching leaves soften a rocky landscape making it perfect for the dry, shady woodland path or rock garden. This plant has no children Legal Status. (1998), but specimens are unknown. Naturally occurring in dry woodlands even underneath hemlocks Carex appalachica is adaptable to almost all garden conditions...except swamps. Ball N. Appalachian sedge. Common names are from state and federal lists. CT, MA, ME, NH, VT; also reported from RI by Gould et al. Size:1 Quart Carex appalachica Fine-textured Appalachian sedge grows in clumps 12" tall in the dry shade of the eastern North American woodlands. Dry-mesic to mesic, deciduous and mixed evergreen-deciduous forests. It is semi-evergreen in moderately cold winter climates. Contact Us Street Address: (For Internet & Navigation Devices) 6N800 IL-25 St. Charles, IL 60174 Phone: (847) 742-1790 Fax: (847) 742-2655 Email: mginfo@midwestgroundcovers.com Current Hours: Monday - Friday: 7:00am - 5:00pm Great for borders, rock gardens, or in containers Carex grass is a drought tolerant variety. Plants are monoecious (spikelets of male flowers above female flowers). The very narrow arching leaves soften a rocky landscape making it perfect for the dry, shady woodland path or rock garden. When planted en masse or on slopes, it curves and intermingles beautifully. Hardy in zones 3-8, Carex appalachica adapts to moist to dry locations in full to part shade. The name Carex radiata was misapplied to this species for many years. Some Carex species require damp or wet conditions while others are relatively drought-tolerant. The very narrow weeping mop-top looking deer-resistant foliage makes an airy 18 wide clump.